Artist’s Bio

Lineman’s Porcelain Memories specializes in one of the oldest and most technical, time consuming arts: Painting on Porcelain.Linda Lineman

In 1980, I took a six week china painting class from Yvonne Klapec that started my enthusiastic appreciation and love of this style of painting.

I enjoy going out with my camera to capture God’s beautiful handiwork and then strive to apply it to the porcelain. Delicate beauty or bold color can be created especially for you to use in your home or as unique gifts to share. With loving care they become the antiques of tomorrow. Custom designed personalized home products, kitchen & bath tile, and fine artwork can all be ordered.IMG_2344E

Following info taken from “Hand Painted Porcelain: Women Played a Major Role..by Debby DuBay”.

Limoges blanks, the shape of the piece of porcelain, came in all forms and sizes: dinnerware, decorative pieces such as chargers and plaques, chocolate, coffee and teapots, jardinières and planters, lamps, punch bowls, tankards, pitchers, vases and jewelry.

This technique utilizes the translucency of china paint to create color, depth and light. Reflection, shadow and shapes can all be used in the background to add interest & dimensions to the paintings. The painting is followed by the kiln firing (baking) process, then multiple more painting & firing that creates a three-dimensional piece.

The art of painting on porcelain would be a lost art if not for the approximately 3,000 talented china painters in the world today. If it was not for a handful of enthusiastic woman, the fine art of china painting may have become a lost are in America.

Jan. 3, 1980, President Carter declared China Painting as a fine art. The art of painting on porcelain has been recognized as a fine art by all the worlds’ great civilizations & has enriched museums in many countries for hundreds of years. This art form, requiring great skill, training, and talent has been enthusiastically adopted and enhanced by thousands of talented Americans whose labors will awe and delight generations yet to come.

Currently, there are two major organizations that promote this art: International Porcelain Artist and Teachers, Inc. widely known as IPAT Inc., and the World Organization of China Painters, (WOCP).  IPAT is made up of more that 3,000 painters in approximately 50 countries around the globe, from beginning to advanced porcelain artists to career professionals. There are also many state and local clubs, along with clubs around the world. In addition there is the Porcelain Painters International On-Line Association. (www.porcelainpainters.com)

Addictive? Well, who isn’t smitten by fine art?